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Researchers at Stanford study forces to better predict mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

Sources – NIH, Stanford Magazine, Medium

There has been a growing body of data on concussion-related brain damage in the sports industry, particularly for football players, and also in war veterans.  Scientists are leading the effort to learn more about mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and how it can be prevented. A team of researchers at Stanford University led by David Camarillo, PhD, is studying head accelerations required to cause mTBI. The study indicates peak strain in the corpus callosum is the best predictor. “While this is only a small study and further research is necessary, I think that it is an exciting step forward in understanding what needs to be considered to better predict mTBI,” said Dr. Grace Peng, Program Director for this grant at NIBIB (according to the National Institute of Health).

“The ability to diagnose mTBI at the time of injury could help protect athletes from further brain damage, reducing their risk of neurodegenerative diseases” says David Camarillo.

Safety standards and previous research have only used 3DOF measurements (the blue, red, and yellow lines) of mTBI to predict incidence, but researchers at Stanford have found that 6DOF measurements may improve mTBI prediction. The rotational movements (turquoise, orange, and green lines) seem critical in predicting mTBI.  Caption: Jessica Meade, NIH Photo Credit: Horia lonescu
Safety standards and previous research have only used 3DOF measurements (the blue, red, and yellow lines) of mTBI to predict incidence, but researchers at Stanford have found that 6DOF measurements may improve mTBI prediction. The rotational movements (turquoise, orange, and green lines) seem critical in predicting mTBI.
Caption: Jessica Meade, NIH Photo Credit: Horia lonescu

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